archive-nz.com » NZ » I » INDEPENDENTWINEMONTHLY.CO.NZ

Total: 183

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • 2011 Jules Taylor Marlborough Pinot Noir – Independent Wine Monthly
    Perhaps there could be a return to the format that was used at the annual London NZ Wine tasting many moons ago which was to have all the wines lined up centrally so that tasters could work through the wines uninterrupted leaving winemakers free to talk to those interested Unless you are one of those members of the media who considers themselves uber important stomping around tasting then retreating to a corner to thrash out notes as if their life depended on it I prefer to potter around catching up with people My freewheeling style meant I finally got to meet and have a talk to Jules Taylor One of my pet theories is that no miserable person ever makes great wine It may be competent sound fault free etc etc but it never reaches the heights nor touches the soul Conversely there are many lovely winemakers who make either brilliant competent or really quite ordinary wine but somehow seem to make the whole experience cheerful I d take a glass ordinary wine made by a chirpy person over one weighed down with the self importance of the maker any day Fortunately Jules turned out to be a delight and

    Original URL path: http://independentwinemonthly.co.nz/?p=629 (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Sea Level Wines – Independent Wine Monthly
    new release 2011 aromatics and were impressed this was a solid offering of well made wines and with RRPs of under 20 attractively priced to boot 2011 Gewurztraminer a very pretty aroma classic rose petal orange blossom and violets Quite delicate and lifted The palate has plenty of character turkish delight and musk A touch of sweetness rounds out the palate Not at all forced with a crisp finish making it an appealing choice for gewurztraminer lovers 2011 Sauvignon Blanc From the Awatere this vibrant crunchy sauvignon has plenty of grassy cucumber and snow pea aromas with just a touch of passionfruit peeping in Punchy without being tiring the fresh acid spine and slightly grapefruit peel ish finish 2011 Chenin Blanc Some green apple waxy honey and fresh herbs on the nose crisp lemony and youthful The palate is surprisingly dry with an attractive chalky quality that makes for a quite savoury style Not particularly lengthy or complex but this was the wine that we chose to drink the most of 2011 Pinot Gris Nice light aromatics a touch of florals ripe nectarine poached pear and spice The palate is just off dry and has fresh vibrant fruit with apple

    Original URL path: http://independentwinemonthly.co.nz/?p=360 (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • 2011 Pinot @ Cloudy Bay Address – Independent Wine Monthly
    of different tastes textures and styles Yes the human hand plays a part but the fact that wines of Gevrey Corton or Morey St Denis are imprinted with a specific character suggests there is something to the terroir argument Unfortunately NZ has not adopted an appellation system and so wine makers wherever they plant grapes are free to experiment Unlike France which has all its pinot producers grouped in the one region let s leave the pinots of Sancerre and Alsace out of the equation NZ winemakers believe that any region from the semi tropical north to the chilly south is capable of producing high quality pinot noir And whilst this may be true though hand on heart we know it not to be the case those winemakers who are serious about making great pinot must now start to distance themselves from those who view pinot as a commodity a wine that completes their portfolio a wine that can be produced without much passion They need to search for terroir Yet whenever the word terroir is mentioned winemakers here either harumph in disdain or else are at pains to point out that terroir is actually the French word for wine faults Suggest to anyone that NZ would benefit from some sort of system of vineyard classification and the same old argument arises That winemakers don t want to be constricted Unless they are left free to experiment then how will the potential of the country be realised That argument has some merit after all countries such as France have had hundreds of years to try and get it right The AOC system first introduced to combat fraud and the risk of overproduction has given many regions a collective voice but it could be argued has also stifled experimentation The reasoning runs if you don t try it you ll never know if it works But it means at the moment you have over 600 NZ wineries all trying their hands at a smorgasbord of different varieties many without conviction or purpose Is this any better I think it is too late to try and establish formal boundaries Unlike French vignerons who whenever there is some viticultural dispute take to the streets riot tear up vines and set fire to trucks their NZ counterparts would never think to cause a civil disturbance Any attempt to set boundaries would no doubt involve so much red tape and legislation that it would be impossible to implement and NZers being non confrontational people wouldn t riot And anyway how do you classify a region The concept of terroir here would be very much an imposed one recognition that soil plus climate through the action of a catalyst ie the human hand gives a taste of a place A few regions have introduced an appellation system Gimblett Gravels for example relies on geographical definition to create a brand and with very little history of winemaking describes a region that is only embarking on the journey Even so the idea that the Gimblett Gravels is a superior sub region is gaining traction with the consumer But I think the argument for an appellation system will probably never be resolved and rather than lose impetus now it is up to individual producers to establish credibilty and respect for their own label NZ pinot producers need to start working with their own vineyards and create wine from somewhere not just anywhere After all nz wine regions are some of the most beautiful and the stronger the connection to the land the easier I think the consumer will be able to identify and seek out premium pinot I d like to see winemakers establish microsites within their vineyards from which particular parcels of fruit are bottled under single parcel labels Don t get me wrong I am not suggesting that individual vineyard wines are better only that they add a layer of complexity and interest for the consumer Single parcel wines from premium producers would make more sense than the standard practice of producing two pinots one the main label and the other undoubtedly more expensive wine the reserve The word reserve is utterly meaningless other than usually to denote the wine has received more oak I always ask a winemaker what does reserve mean and why have they chosen to bottle a wine labelled in this way What exactly makes it better and more expensive I very rarely get a convincing answer more likely a mumble about it being a barrel selection whatever that means The term reserve or some other nebulous word has almost no meaning nothing tangible And please don t get me started on super premium wines wines that rarely speak of any sense of place but more of the over the top packaging clearly more suited to the duty free shop than the cellar of a serious wine collector Can anyone however talented really hunt for sites that will express superb terroir or is the realisation that you have an exceptional site a lucky break The only real test is time and you can t hurry the process especially as producers only make one vintage a year I am not suggesting that this is a process that can happen overnight But encouragingly some producers those with longer established vineyards have chosen to start experimenting and bottling specific parcels Will these single vineyard wines confuse the consumer I may be wrong but I believe the type of wine lover who is interested in high quality pinot noir is probably able to read The label shouldn t provide too much of a problem High involvement consumers are more savvy than we give them credit for It is an error of judgement to assume that wine lovers have to understand the concept of terroir or individual sites in order to enjoy the wine Understanding of terroir is challenging but sensual enjoyment and appreciation of terroir derived differences is not Reading the list of wines we ll taste

    Original URL path: http://independentwinemonthly.co.nz/?p=19 (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Somewhere Exciting – Independent Wine Monthly
    a veritable treasure trove of delicious understated and ever so faintly mad wines A note on the labels F Series is a designation given to Framingham s boundary pushers which are vintage specific and generally in much smaller volumes the other wines fall under the main Framingham label First up was the trio of Alsatian style wines The F Series Pinot Gris Vendange Tardive 40 500ml is rich with floral honeyed dried fruit undercut with a salty seaside tang and slight herbal undercurrent Lovely richness and length decadent though in a decidedly elegant manner The F Series Gewürztraminer Vendange Tardive 40 500ml is a more spicy beast with an enticing nose a wonderfully layered seamless palate very caressing The F Series Gewürztraminer Sélection de Grains Nobles 60 375ml is the full botrytised monty golden and intensely spicy hugely lush but also gentle and delicate the wine has immense poise with masses of character but is never overwhelming Retains good varietal character despite the depth of botrytis and has a wonderful fresh finish All three wines had the grace and substance to stand alone and would be all too easy to drink this way but it also would be a shame if they never saw a platter of decent pâté and cheese or indeed an appropriate pudding Superb The second flight was the six German inspired wines the Prädikat Series Framingham s riesling all comes from an estate block which includes some very old vines 30 years and it has long been known for its quality and consistency The six following wines evolved from hand harvested fruit taken at the first pass of ripe bronzed berries on March 20th through to the heavily botrytised grapes that were left in mid May The consistency across the wines in terms of their quality elegance freshness balance and intensity presumably owes as much to the meticulously cared for vineyard as it does the skill of the winemaking The F Series Riesling Kabinett 35 750ml harvested 20th March is water pale racy and yet almost ethereal in its delicacy Limey stony mineral it belies its 58g L RS such is its crispness and verve Almost ridiculous in its ease of drinking The Framingham Select Riesling 35 750ml harvested April 1st is clearly kith kin retaining the Kabinett s freshness and elegance but this is a weightier altogether more textural wine A delicious pithy stoniness to the finish lemony and restrained with a fascinating red fruit quality fresh raspberries Very smart The F Series Riesling Auslese 40 500ml harvested in two passes 12th April May 1st is a change in tempo with more honeyed depth emerging as well as a custardy creaminess think kaffir lime pannacotta A step up in sweetness and intensity plus some botrytis character showing in the spicy apricots this has a softer overall feel than the preceding wines though it retains the hallmark freshness and elegance Nice herbal white flowers on the finish clean and bright The Framingham Noble Riesling 35 375ml

    Original URL path: http://independentwinemonthly.co.nz/?p=67 (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • marlborough – Page 2 – Independent Wine Monthly
    variety New Zealand would not enjoy Read More Leave a comment marlborough 2010 Forrest Estate The Doctor s Riesling Posted on 12 09 2010 14 12 2012 I still find it a slight thrill when the first wines of the current vintage start to come through and it was indeed a thrill to taste the 2010 Forrest Estate Doctor s Riesling Fresh as a daisy and redolent of honeysuckle citrus blossom and a delicious underlying wet stone minerality this wine made the still Read More Leave a comment marlborough Subtle Sauvignon Blanc Posted on 10 08 2010 14 12 2012 There is no doubt that NZ can make world class sauvignon blanc and winemakers have perfected the art of producing vibrant immensely flavourful sauvignons brimming over with passionfruit and gooseberry flavours But winemakers are a restless bunch always looking for a new challenge and there is a growing number keen to see where they can Read More Leave a comment marlborough Marlborough Part Three Greywacke and Dog Point Posted on 24 06 2010 14 12 2012 We left Churton replete with both the most delicious lunch and careful instructions on how to get to Dog Point Vineyard from Mandy Weaver

    Original URL path: http://independentwinemonthly.co.nz/?cat=18&paged=2 (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Remember the Consumer ? – Independent Wine Monthly
    encompassing regional characters but is this really a little premature in respect of vineyards that are only two decades old at best Our industry is still in its infancy nurtured and parented by loving yet anxious winemaker parents At this stage does the human hand shape a wine more than the soil climate and clone hopefully clones if we listen to Matt Kramer In the future I m sure we ll be able to define specific terroirs but let this develop naturally and at its own pace We currently define ourselves through our fixation with ratings scores and medals But a glowing review massive score or five star recommendation may not be enough probably isn t enough to sell your wine You need to engage with the consumer distributor importer and tell your story This is a country rich with personality but by reducing wines to numbers you risk becoming just another wine with a gold medal Leave the scores behind and start telling the tale Perhaps we should take a leaf from the artisan food world The Slow Food movement encourages us to maximise the enjoyment we take in eating and promotes the production of sustainably sourced and locally produced food The lunch yesterday was a great example of high quality regional food served simply but conveying a real sense of the flavour of the South The best wines should always have a connection to the land that produced them and this is where our next speaker comes in But before that a couple of other observations Duncan told me that going off topic was ok New Zealand is lucky that it has more than its fair share of magnificent landscapes So I do think it is a real shame if each region doesn t take full advantage of this I was in London last week and every time my credit card was examined I couldn t decide if the identification chip didn t work or had been sabotaged by my husband I had the same response NZ wow I have always wanted to go there its meant to be amazing Is this why Central Otago Pinot has been so successful Its marketing material plays heavily on the landscape and entices consumers to drink its wines and make a connection to the region Drink a glass of our pinot and you too can be part of the scene I spent Christmas in Otago and was so carried away I found myself signing up to walk the Dart track And I m from London and usually have a panic attack at the thought of having to walk to the bus stop Gifted a land of unparalled beauty why not use it to promote your wines Finally if I could just make one tiny further observation We seem to be overlooking one important group Hardly anyone here has mentioned the consumer And only then in a slightly derogatory manner laughing at their choice of wine Remember Gerald Ratner the owner of

    Original URL path: http://independentwinemonthly.co.nz/?p=556 (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • In for a penny . . . – Independent Wine Monthly
    with the purported guise of independence not actual payment per se these are two very separate issues I do acknowledge there may be surface similarities but I think there is a significant difference between accepting unsolicited hospitality and requesting payment to review a wine In many cases the only opportunity to taste a wine arises from attending such lunches and launches It also frequently provides an opportunity which may not otherwise be available to speak face to face with winemakers and owners You won t stop producers hosting such events wine is after all part of the hospitality industry and if you wish to cover as broad a range of wines and views as possible it would be difficult to eschew them entirely So you judge whether they are in fact useful from an access to wines people point of view or whether they are just a junket schmooze and accept decline accordingly Attending a presentation of wines however convivial a form it may take results in several unpaid hours of one s time outlay of travel parking costs and further time spent writing articles which may or may not generate payment to the writer Jane and I have touched on this topic before and are not unaware of the pitfalls of attending said fabulous lunches and the unspoken anticipation of what might arise from it However while there might be expectation there is never obligation And this is where it begins to separate from requesting that payment be sent with wines for review Like it or not the very nature of a direct payment from producer to reviewer implies a shifting of balance in the relationship and brings with it insinuation of bias even if no bias does actually occur It places one in the position of having to defend one s integrity the only currency a critic should trade in The end result rests alone with the ethos and integrity of the writer or reviewer in question I remain steadfast that transparent independence is crucial for integrity and it is this upon which your reputation hinges In moments of 3am existentialism I have wrestled with the concept of the parasitical nature of being a wine critic but have come to the conclusion disciplines with robust critics are often those that scale the greatest heights producers and critics alike should strive therefore for rigorous and thoughtful reviews that can have no whiff of collusion between the parties involved Particularly in an industry of our size it can be difficult to give a review that is less than favourable as you remain in close contact with people and often the person s in question are genuinely likeable Unfortunately sometimes their wines aren t equally as likeable And of course one doesn t want to offend or disappoint However at some point you must decide whether you live according to your own conscience or otherwise and therefore you write to suit Producers might need to have an honest look at their

    Original URL path: http://independentwinemonthly.co.nz/?p=69 (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Declaration of Independence – Independent Wine Monthly
    of independence Strictly speaking this may be the case the reviewers are not working for anyone directly and are providing their own opinions BUT it is impossible not to suspect that reviews may indeed be on the shall we say generous side Of course opinions on wines differ between critics and even by the same critic on different days but so many of the wines reviewed are the euphemistically named export label sauvignon blanc etc and generally the fulsome reviews and scores given in such reviews do not stand scrutiny elsewhere What to make of that However the biggest elephant in the crowded room to my mind is the fact that generally the public is completely unaware that any payment between producer and reviewer is changing hands And this is where I start to feel very uncomfortable indeed about the unclarified proclamations of independence and their use as such by producers and retailers who are after all complicit in the whole situation Yes the terms and prices are stated on the reviewers sites but that is certainly not where the majority of their reviews are being read And reviews below a certain cut off point are not published who exactly is that helping Sam Kim of Wine Orbit and Raymond Chan of Raymond Chan Wine Reviews may at this point wonder if I am having a go or perhaps have succumbed to the green eyed monster due to the parlous state of my own bank balance but I can only assure them this is not the case They do happen to be the most visible faces of this service but they are not the only ones doing it And amongst the wine industry fraternity it is well known that this is the way things are being done But amongst the

    Original URL path: http://independentwinemonthly.co.nz/?p=72 (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive